User Pass

Forum > General Discussion > Politics and Religion > Breaking news: horse dewormer doesn't kill coronavirus

Page:
 

Last Online: Aug 3, 2022 16:49:45
Link
according to the right, there was no virus....yet they suggested all kinds of things could cure it
Trump didn't just lose. He lost big.
 

Last Online: Aug 18, 2022 13:05:41
Coyote
Link
Originally posted by Cowpoker
Yeah, I usually throw a rope or pipe across the chute or alley behind them and tail jack them. It helps to have a catwalk built on the side of the alley.

The wild ones and the jumpers usually get culled out.



Well, non-cow people will call me crazy but I think maybe you know this bit already. Cows have varying personalities just like we do. There's scardy cows and mellow cows (as well as others) and those scardy one's can get real fidgety when they feel trapped. Maybe they're claustrophobic? Don't know as I don't speak moo well. Just know they can be one way out in the open and another when cornered. Some are so laid back it's jaw dropping. Had a milk cow that would let you sleep on her back or go for a ride. And another that would run you over if you cornered her... but would let you milk her and pet her all day as long as it wasn't in a stall (narrow/confined) so we milked her out in the open... never had an issue. Go figure.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUeptFM6xpE
Originally posted by DigitalDaggers
wipety-wipe-wipe

 

Last Online: Aug 18, 2022 10:48:10
Link
Originally posted by Theo Wizzago
Well, non-cow people will call me crazy but I think maybe you know this bit already. Cows have varying personalities just like we do. There's scardy cows and mellow cows (as well as others) and those scardy one's can get real fidgety when they feel trapped. Maybe they're claustrophobic? Don't know as I don't speak moo well. Just know they can be one way out in the open and another when cornered. Some are so laid back it's jaw dropping. Had a milk cow that would let you sleep on her back or go for a ride. And another that would run you over if you cornered her... but would let you milk her and pet her all day as long as it wasn't in a stall (narrow/confined) so we milked her out in the open... never had an issue. Go figure.


I'm very selective with the cow herd, if they exhibit flighty or aggressive behavior or are hard to handle, they get culled. I use bulls that have high docility ratings although you can take it too far where they simply won't move at all when you are working them.

It's funny, I am calving now and I want a cow that is very concerned when I am checking her calf. I want her right in my face, vocalizing her disapproval of my proximity to her offspring but I don't want to have ribs broken again or teeth knocked out. I don't like it when cows go in self preservation mode and completely abandon the calf but don't like being pinned under a cows head either.

 

Last Online: Aug 18, 2022 10:48:10
Link
I even keep notes and record on how they and their weaned calves exit the squeeze chute. I want to open the door and have them walk out calmly. I put a flag by the ones that hit the head gate at 100 mph and bust out like Secretariat out of the starting gate.

That being said, you can have the calmest set of cows, be very selective in using high docility bulls with generations of proof of easy handling cattle and you still get the occasional outlier filled with piss and vinegar that knocks the dust off of every swing gate in the barn.
 

Last Online: Aug 18, 2022 13:05:41
Coyote
Link
Originally posted by Cowpoker
I'm very selective with the cow herd, if they exhibit flighty or aggressive behavior or are hard to handle, they get culled. I use bulls that have high docility ratings although you can take it too far where they simply won't move at all when you are working them.

It's funny, I am calving now and I want a cow that is very concerned when I am checking her calf. I want her right in my face, vocalizing her disapproval of my proximity to her offspring but I don't want to have ribs broken again or teeth knocked out. I don't like it when cows go in self preservation mode and completely abandon the calf but don't like being pinned under a cows head either.



Well, sure you know this but the more you interact with them the less they become spooky whenever you're around. Now mind you... largest herd we ever had was about 500 (on 350 acres)... but we made sure to call 'em up for feed then walk among and make contact about twice a week. They got pretty use to having us about and only a couple were ever 'super spooky' to the point of us abundantly cautious around them. Even the bulls.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUeptFM6xpE
Originally posted by DigitalDaggers
wipety-wipe-wipe

 

Last Online: Aug 15, 2022 22:48:46
no title
Link
I once learned that you can't call it a "cow" until it has it's first calf. At the time, I thought to myself "When the hell am I ever gonna use that knowledge"?
Well, here we are.... with me contributing to the conversation, and wondering.... Are the heifers or cows more difficult in that situation?

 

Last Online: Aug 18, 2022 10:38:01
fur eel
Link
Then again if you didn't know what a heifer was you could still get by with "that incel"
Want to join the Pen Fifteen club?
 

Last Online: Aug 18, 2022 13:17:13
Link
Originally posted by FOOTBALL MADNESS
according to the right, there was no virus....yet they suggested all kinds of things could cure it


Wasnt it the left who said go eat at your fav restaurants it is nothing?
Wasnt it the left who said they would never take this vaccine?

Or did we forget that part already?
 

Last Online: Aug 18, 2022 10:48:10
Link
Originally posted by wormser1971
I once learned that you can't call it a "cow" until it has it's first calf. At the time, I thought to myself "When the hell am I ever gonna use that knowledge"?
Well, here we are.... with me contributing to the conversation, and wondering.... Are the heifers or cows more difficult in that situation?


Bingo.

Typically cows handle easier but are more protective of their calves
 

Last Online: Aug 18, 2022 14:08:44
Admin
Link
Originally posted by Hammer31
Wasnt it the left who said go eat at your fav restaurants it is nothing?
Wasnt it the left who said they would never take this vaccine?

Or did we forget that part already?


wut
Six inches of pure deliciousness...on a stick!
 

Last Online: Aug 18, 2022 13:17:13
Link
Originally posted by Corndog
wut


https://www.nbcbayarea.com/news/local/nancy-pelosi-visits-san-franciscos-chinatown/2240247/

https://www.presidency.ucsb.edu/documents/campaign-press-release-fact-kamala-harriss-anti-vaccine-rhetoric-anti-science-and

https://abcnews.go.com/Politics/video/biden-trust-vaccine-proven-safe-scientists-73058501

Let me know if you need more
Edited by Hammer31 on Mar 30, 2022 06:11:46
 

Last Online: Aug 18, 2022 14:08:44
Admin
Link
Originally posted by Hammer31
Let me know if you need more


No need.

Did a quick look and all 4 of the videos I watched they said to wait until expert opinions. Did you actually watch what was said or make up a narrative?
Six inches of pure deliciousness...on a stick!
 

Last Online: Aug 18, 2022 13:05:41
Coyote
Link
Originally posted by Cowpoker
Bingo.

Typically cows handle easier but are more protective of their calves


Yup and nothing is worse than a 1st time mother. By the 2nd or 3rd (or beyond) calf they know the drill and are far less likely to get whack (upset badly) about you pokin your paws and nose into their business. Besides. A farmer that bonds (talkin simple 'getting use to humans' type here... not making pets or worse) with their calves has far less issues later when that 'heifer' becomes a 'cow' and trusts the farmer more than one he just bought at the market or one he never interacted with.
https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=oUeptFM6xpE
Originally posted by DigitalDaggers
wipety-wipe-wipe

 

Last Online: Aug 15, 2022 22:48:46
no title
Link
Originally posted by Cowpoker
Bingo.

Typically cows handle easier but are more protective of their calves


We had some heavy rain here for a few days back in 2019. A friend of mine lived next to a farm, and one of the calves had gotten stuck in a creek that had swelled up significantly. He saw the farmer trying to help the calf, so he decid3ed to go give an assist. The cows were completely unfamiliar with him, and the farmer knew what would happen so he shouted at him to stay back... He didn't hear him, and continues on to the calf. Before he could get there, the mother cow charged him, gave him a head butt and threw him in the air. When he landed, that cow jumped on him and stomped him for a good bit. Thankfully the ground was mud everywhere, so each stomp was a bit weaker than it could have been. He was hospitalized with pretty severe injuries, and some internal bleeding. He looked like he had been in a train wreck and it took almost a year to recover, but he did recover.
We all learned something that day, but for him it was a pretty hard lesson... Those cows have no idea what your plan is, and will always revert to "protect the calf".

 

Last Online: Aug 18, 2022 10:48:10
Link
Originally posted by wormser1971
We had some heavy rain here for a few days back in 2019. A friend of mine lived next to a farm, and one of the calves had gotten stuck in a creek that had swelled up significantly. He saw the farmer trying to help the calf, so he decid3ed to go give an assist. The cows were completely unfamiliar with him, and the farmer knew what would happen so he shouted at him to stay back... He didn't hear him, and continues on to the calf. Before he could get there, the mother cow charged him, gave him a head butt and threw him in the air. When he landed, that cow jumped on him and stomped him for a good bit. Thankfully the ground was mud everywhere, so each stomp was a bit weaker than it could have been. He was hospitalized with pretty severe injuries, and some internal bleeding. He looked like he had been in a train wreck and it took almost a year to recover, but he did recover.
We all learned something that day, but for him it was a pretty hard lesson... Those cows have no idea what your plan is, and will always revert to "protect the calf".


I've been under a cow like that and the cow knew me, it was her 9th calf. I suspect she had some sort of fever or shock. They are so powerful and so agile and can be incredibly dangerous. I managed to get my fingers in her nostrils and that probably saved my life. She was kneeling with one knee on each side of my rib cage and was trying to crush my chest in to the ground with her head. I was on my back and completely screwed. Broken ribs, broken nose, sore but incredibly lucky. The cow stepped on the inside of my knee right on the big part of the femur, nothing broken but that spot hurt for 3 months or more and honestly she likely just slid across it while stepping. People don't realize how fast cows are because they generally don't run full speed but they can move.

They don't like strangers, that's for sure and the situation you are describing, she was probably already stressed with her calf in danger. With most of my cows, that protection mode only lasts about 24-48 hours. My neighbors always joke that they are going to steal a calf in the spring and I laugh and tell them "good luck"

Edited by Cowpoker on Mar 30, 2022 12:35:32
Page:

Post Reply

You are not logged in. Please login if you want to post a reply.